Advice for water underfloor heating - 1970s bungalow

Discussion in 'General Flooring Chat' started by BradRBubbs, Apr 26, 2022.

  1. BradRBubbs

    BradRBubbs New Member

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    Hi,

    I don't know whether I'm posting in the right place but I'm hoping for some advice on what wet UFH system to get for our renovation of a 1970s 3 bed bungalow. The house had subsidence so in the process of fixing that the floors were dug up and replaced with the following construction: hardcore base, membrane, 150mm insulation, concrete finish. Unfortunately we had no say in this setup so we're stuck with it now. We're left with a 40-50mm gap between the concrete and the base of the front door, which obviously limits what we can do with UFH.

    There are of course low-profile retrofit UFH options and we'd have liked to have gone with the Nu-Heat LoPro Max with self levelling compound but that is way too expensive for our budget (double what we want to pay). What are our other options, especially considering our 40-50mm gap, and the 150mm insulation beneath the concrete? I've seen the pre-cut boards that pipes are laid in which have no compound/screed on top, would these work well enough with our floor construction? Or should we go down the normal route with pipes in screed but only have 40mm thickness?

    Insulation below a concrete slab means the concrete becomes a part of the thermal mass, so because it has a slow response time would it make sense for the UFH to be run continuously? We'll be installing an air-source heat pump together with insulation above the ceiling and on the outside of the house with a render and/or cladding, so would this help with the response time and/or be sufficient to run continuously or intermittently?

    Any help would be really appreciated!
     
  2. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    I think a good plumber or builder would answer your question better? Ufh companies will tell you their system will work brilliantly but you really need to make sure the house is properly insulated and suitable for ufh or you will waste money


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. MikeJoe

    MikeJoe New Member

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    There are limited installation Low volumes options, and we preferred the Nu-Heat LoPro Plus with self-leveling fluid, but it was way out of our price range. What other choices do we have, particularly with a gap of insulation below the cementitious materials? How could the pre-cut planks with no concrete or screed on top that tubing is laid in work with the way our floor is built? Or should we proceed normally with pipes in screed even though the layer?Does it sound right for the UFH to also be operated constantly given that soundproofing beneath a floor foundation causes the material to become a part of the thermal mass and has a delayed response time? Might well installing a wind-heat pump, soundproofing above the ceilings, and render and/or coating along the outside of the helpdesk with reaction times be enough to operate permanently or temporarily
     

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