Engineered wood floor, advice

Discussion in 'Wood' started by NeilL, Aug 10, 2023.

  1. NeilL

    NeilL New Member

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    Hi

    I want to install an engineered wood floor over existing floorboards. Mostly they are in good condition, but some will need resolving prior to installation.

    It will be herringbone pattern.

    I have been to several retailers for quotes, and when they have come to have a look at the property there seems to be a wide deviation in advice. I'm afraid I don't really know much about flooring, so would someone be able to shed any light on the following:

    1. The benefits of glueing vs. floating the floor. Three retailers have strongly advised glueing, whereas one has equally strongly recommended floating the floor. When I have looked at the manufacturer guidelines/specifications, it seems that some manufacturers (such as V4) only advise glueing, whereas other (such as Ted Todd) say that the floors can be glued or floated. The total floor area is about 25 square meters, spread across three rooms. My main worry about gluing the floor is that it's never coming up if there is a problem with the pipes or wires under the floor; but would a floating floor actually be any easier to remove?

    2. Ensuring the floor is level. Our floor is not massively uneven, but in the corners of two rooms the floor does dip slightly, probably following the joists. It's not a serious problem, but it does mean that the floor is not totally even. Each retailer has given different advice on this. One said it doesn't really matter, the ply will basically even it out, though a slight un-levelness will remain. Another has said that the floor cannot be installed unless the floor is totally even; to achieve this he can screed the floor (is this OK over a wooden subfloor?). What would your advice be about this?

    Thanks for your advice.

    Neil
     
  2. Rugmunching

    Rugmunching Well-Known Member

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    Being as it is herringbone then you want to make sure it's the best level possible as herringbone opens up alot easier than say a straight plank. Either way you'll need to make sure you have a flat level floor.

    I'd 9mm the whole area, feather where it needs it and fully glue the wood. Floating is OK but I'd glue the tongue & groove after seeing this stuff look gappy as hell after a few months if not done properly.
     
  3. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    Have any of them taken moisture readings of the floorboards?
    Herringbone is much better stuck down. Wouldn’t want to float that. Avoid Ted todd
    9mm ply and glue down as above if the floors dry.
    most of the levelling compounds only go over timber floors 6mm. May be better to use thinner ply to level out before the 9mm goes over the top
     
  4. NeilL

    NeilL New Member

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    Thanks both for your advice. Very useful.

    @merit when you say use a thinner ply first, do you mean cover the whole floor in a thinner ply, then apply levelling compound where needed, then apply the 9mm ply?

    Thanks for advice re. Ted Todd.
     
  5. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    No, either pack out the low spots with thinner ply, then ply over with the 9mm. Or you could use a levelling
    Compound on the low spot then 9mm ply over it.
    If it’s not going too deep you can ply first then level over the ply. Each to their own
     
  6. NeilL

    NeilL New Member

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    OK thanks that's very clear.
     

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