Engineered wood raised and dipped

Discussion in 'Wood' started by Johnnyweetabix, Nov 1, 2022.

  1. Johnnyweetabix

    Johnnyweetabix New Member

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    Hi all . First time poster so thank you all for bearing with me. Just over two years ago my wife and I had the whole of our ground floor of our house fitted with engineered oak wood.

    It was installed by a tradesman on a concrete floor throughout the whole of the ground floor
    Which was not levelled and I suspect not -00% perfect

    The wooden floor covers the entirety of the ground floor, including between the doors etc literally all wood, no gaps between each room
    Door.

    Last year, I noticed that the two small planks that fit between the living room and hallway where the doorframes are, were dipping where they fitted together. Consequently, the planks that are against those are raised slightly. So if you run your foot over it, you kind of feel a slight up-and-down movement, and it means that the door is jamming against the floor when I try and open or close the door.

    not all of the wooden planks throughout the whole ground floor floor like this, it seems primarily around one door and the subsequent planks that are up against those (being opposite to the dip.)

    I seem to remember that over the winter period it levelled out a bit more, and then appeares more in the summer, but at the moment they are still dipped and haven’t gone back.
    I remember the fitters saying that our concrete floor had a high moisture content, and I’m struggling to think whether I can actually do anything now the whole floor is down other than sand more off the bottom of the door

    Apologies, for wittering on and I am sure I’m not very clear, but I wanted to see if there was any experts out there, who might be able to offer any thoughts.

    Do I get him back ? I suspect he will say I told you I was not perfect.
     

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  2. Paul webb

    Paul webb Well-Known Member

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    Looks like it may have expanded and with that being the shortest length, it would also be the weakest point,you could try checking the expansion gaps on the width. Did the fitter do anything about the moisture before he fitted it?
     
  3. tarkett85

    tarkett85 Well-Known Member

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    Needed screeding and a surface dpm doing it’s always going to have too much moisture in the concrete for wood


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. Rugmunching

    Rugmunching Well-Known Member

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    Your fitter said your concrete had a high moisture content?....and he still fitted the floor without addressing it?

    You might have to cut it and put a threshold strip in that doorway
     
  5. Johnnyweetabix

    Johnnyweetabix New Member

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    Thanks all and yuk whilst I totally appreciate your answers , having spent a lot on it , it’s disheartening to see the answers .

    Yes he fitted it but did say he wished he had not taken it on once he started did say the concrete seemed to hold moisture. Feel like I wished I’d reflected more. I might need to try and get someone in . Thank you all
     
  6. Johnnyweetabix

    Johnnyweetabix New Member

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    Sorry again to ask a really stupid question but I am sure that last year once the central heating was on for a while it felt like the wood went back to its original shape. We’ve not had the central heating on much this year so far, do you think I might see some improvement over the next few weeks once the heating has been on?. Or I’ve been totally stupid! thanks
     
  7. Rugmunching

    Rugmunching Well-Known Member

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    It may be past it now where its now moved and found its place therefore you may not see any difference....but what will you do when it comes to not using the central heating again...

    Subtle threshold strip fix is your best hope but with what you saying then the boards could have taken on that moisture
     
  8. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    Was it floated on underlay or glued direct to the concrete?
     
  9. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    Door threshold is the probably your only option now
     
  10. Paul webb

    Paul webb Well-Known Member

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    I assume there is also quite a dip in the subfloor, looking at the size of the gap between the wood and the door frame
     

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