line across karndean

Discussion in 'Introduce yourself' started by sara, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. sara

    sara Member

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    This is the floor after it was laid, the back of the house was then knocked out and this is where the line has appeared
     
  2. sara

    sara Member

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    This is the floor after it was laid, the back of the house was then knocked out and this is where the line has appeared View attachment 10245
     
  3. mjfl

    mjfl Well-Known Member

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    correct :)
     
  4. sara

    sara Member

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    Do you think I have a right to go back to the Karndean fitter/supplier then please? They provided a 2 year guarantee on fitting
     
  5. mjfl

    mjfl Well-Known Member

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    So if the new floor was done before the wall was knocked out
    How did they get the levels correct?
    Surely this is why you now have different levels in the first place.
    Also the installer should have stitched the two floors together before bringing the level up to the old part.
    Can you remember if the poured stuff was sand cement or something like gypsum??
     
  6. sara

    sara Member

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    Not sure why, they had to put a big steel in the back of the house so this is why they left the back wall in I assumed?
    How do they stitch the two levels together? He just poured some liquid over the join that the dried, which you can see in the pics. Before he covered the whole floor in the scree .
    I’m sorry I don’t know what was poured, I think it was cement as don’t remember them saying g gypsum at all. Sorry not very helpful I know!
     
  7. mjfl

    mjfl Well-Known Member

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    You may want to find out exactly what they did pour in, this could turn out quite different if it's a calcium sulphate/gypsum floor.
    If it is just concrete then the wire mesh is there for reinforcement.
    As the floor hasn't been consolidated it will move independently to each other, also you will get damp come through between the two slabs as they are separate.
     
  8. mjfl

    mjfl Well-Known Member

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    Probably best to get the builder in and ask floor he's put in and get the flooring contractor back aswell.
     
  9. Spacey

    Spacey Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It's been poured outside so its more than likely normal Portland cement
     
  10. alban

    alban Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    what do you guys mean by stitch it together ?

    Thanks
     
  11. pf flooring

    pf flooring Well-Known Member

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    Not wanting to throw the floodwater under a bus but it's his problem to rectify, he should of called it before installing, not a great finish by builder but he went over it, not that hard to repair mind, uplift section chase it out epoxy fibre the gap then repair with feather rapid or screed and refit section, more time consuming than overly costly
     
  12. sara

    sara Member

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    Thank you for your post, I don’t know anything about floors but I am worried now that this is going to be costly and a real pain to sort , and when we had the floor put down we were under the impression that it would look good for a decent amount of time-e.g 10 years so for it to have this after 12 months is really disappointing. The floorer is going to come and have a look next week
     
  13. Spacey

    Spacey Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The floor is only as Good as what's underneath Like everything it's all in the preparation
     
  14. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately the quality of most builders lets us down. Nearly every subfloor I look at has problems. Not flat, not dry, not the right mix not the right levelling compound. For me that’s the builders fault. Unfortunately your floor layer should of pointed out the potential problem and then charged you extra to rectify the poor subfloor construction or given you the chance to try and get the builder to do a decent job. Either way you have to pay more or have that awkward conversation with the builder. It’s not hard to fix either, just a shame to have to lift it all and sort it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. Arron

    Arron Member

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    If the slab has dropped surely the floor layer wouldn't have been able to prevent this with what ever prep method he used?
     
  16. alban

    alban Well-Known Member

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    Hi ,

    To add a different perspective on this , your architect would have drawn up a specification for this slab/ works and building control would probably inspected the membrane etc prior to the slab being poured . The concrete would be a specified premix and assuming he has followed this he has done what he was asked . These are two two independent floors of different construction and mass .

    The floor layer could of treated the cracks i assume the stitching and resin are the Uzin repair system however "if " as your friend has said the new slab has dropped this wouldn't have stopped it . We have just had the hottest summer on record and this may be settlement . Maybe ask your architect for his opinion .


    Thanks
     
  17. Garalaaa

    Garalaaa New Member

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    Was this ever resolved my floor has done this also but 7 years later
     

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