Old house - New floor advice

Discussion in 'Subfloor Preparation' started by IanR1, May 13, 2020.

  1. IanR1

    IanR1 Member

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    Hello,

    My first post here so please be gentle !

    Anyway to cut a long story short, moved into an house built in 1905, started to re-decorate room 1, could smell damp when we pulled the carpet up, further inspection found the floorboards fixed to the concrete with nails through the asphalt/bitumen had been pulling up moisture and slowly rotting them out. So after much thought and research I thought i'd dig it all out and start again and get a proper DPM in and i'm left with this:

    rsz_1rsz_img_1398.png

    I am going to go for underfloor heating but before I call in the professionals i'd like to know what layers of what product to put down, as i'm sure I can do some of the labour prep work and leave them to do the screed.

    I have roughly 300mm and the floor covering the boss would like is around 22mm

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. Rugmunching

    Rugmunching Well-Known Member

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    God dyammm!
     
  3. Spacey

    Spacey Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Wow you've done a cracking job so far

    Needs visqueen sheets laid tanked up the walls and suitable water proof tape seams then new concrete poured For starters
     
  4. Spacey

    Spacey Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Depends what type of UFH you want aslo You could have a hot water pipe system laid into the new slab which can be expensive or go for an electric mesh type you lay on top of the slab then a smoothing compound over it
     
  5. IanR1

    IanR1 Member

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I'll be going for an wet system as its highly likely i'm going to have to do the same to each floor ground level which will do away with the surface ran pipework we currently have.

    Would I need to put hardcore down first and if so roughly how much ?

    With the DPM as I understand in a new build they would then put it inot a brick course, what am I to do with it now ?

    What sort of depth concrete slab would I require, is there a minimum ?

    Thanks again in advance.
     
  6. merit

    merit Well-Known Member

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    Surely these are questions for building regs?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Spacey

    Spacey Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You need to speak to your builders and UFH installers

    You dont need to and shouldn't do any further work Let the professionals take care of it
     
  8. IanR1

    IanR1 Member

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    Yes I totally agree.

    Was just trying to gauge if I need to go any deeper.

    Reading through the regs it’s 100mm min for concrete.

    I also like to do a bit of research to make sure the job will be done properly as this will be our forever home so want it to last and not get my pants pulled down by a cowboy using inferior materials.
     
  9. IanR1

    IanR1 Member

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    Any recommendations for a company that could do the job in the Norwich area ?
     
  10. dazlight

    dazlight Super Moderator

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    Mario might know someone
     
  11. Cre8tiveflooring

    Cre8tiveflooring Well-Known Member

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    You looking for a builder? I live 30mins from Norwich and could put you in touch with a few


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. mjfl

    mjfl Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Dazlight.
    IanR1 let me know if you require someone to come round and advise.
     
  13. IanR1

    IanR1 Member

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    Concrete part of the job sorted, I have a builder doing the work Saturday for me - Thanks for the offer.

    Insulation should be here Friday and plumber g'd up ready to get the pipes in.

    I have been getting some quotes for the screed - Wow that stuff is expensive, I am looking at the Thermio+ is this stuff really that good ?
     

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