Two types of flooring together

Discussion in 'General Flooring Chat' started by Ron28, Jul 31, 2020.

  1. Ron28

    Ron28 New Member

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    Hi all, new here, nice to meet you,

    So here is the story, I am in the process of buying a new build flat. The lounge is 6m by 5m roughly of laminated wood floorboard and in the corner there is a 2m x 2m tiled section. Please see the attached picture for reference.

    The developer added this tiled area as they were going to turn it into a "winter garden" sort of like an indoor balcony but stopped halfway through (didn't install the glass walls etc) so I am left with this random 2mx2m of tiled area.

    Now it doesn't look too bad, however it's the silver trimming between the floorboard and tiles that is a bit ugly. I am planning on having a dining table going across the two and having that trimming is just a bit ugly.

    Now I have two choices:

    1) Completely take up the tiling and refit it with floorboard so it will be seamless
    2) Remove the trimming and try to make it flush

    I have spoken to the supplier over phone today about this and he reckons the for option 1 may cost about c. £500 overall to do

    For option two, he says that I cannot have the two materials flush against each other as there needs to be a gap for when the floorboard expands (temperature etc).

    I then asked if we could fill the gap with something that is soft like silicone and he says that it is doable however the issue with that is that the end of the floorboard is not exactly straight in that the builders at the time would have done a poor job of the finishing since it was being covered by the silver trimming anyways. This means that when silicone is filled in the gap, it will be jagged.

    I didn't really understand this explanation as in my mind the jagged stuff is at the bottom, so when you fill it with silicone, I thought it would fill in the gaps no matter how jagged and be nice and smooth, but he says this is not the case. He tried to explain it, but me being not a much of a DIYer cannot picture it and have just taken his word for it. He did mention that a way around this would be to cut the jagged edges so that it will be straight but then the gap would be bigger. Or the other method would be to use new floorboards.

    ANYWAYS, my questions are:

    A) Which of the two methods above (or any other methods I should try?) should I do?
    B) Any idea how much this would cost builders to do all inclusive?
    C) Any other recommendations and advice?

    Thanks!
     

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  2. Carpet tucker

    Carpet tucker Member

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    Don't ask a builder to do it ask a floorlayer
     
  3. Rugmunching

    Rugmunching Well-Known Member

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    D) leave it as it is
    E) replace with a more premium trim
    F) don't buy it
    E)....ill think of something....
     
  4. Paul webb

    Paul webb Well-Known Member

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    Another option might be to use a better trim, have a look at stairrods uk website ( I'm going to start asking for commission from them lol)
     
  5. Ron28

    Ron28 New Member

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    Thank you, I didn't think about using premium trimmings.

    I looked at that stairrods website and found this inlay thing:

    upload_2020-7-31_23-21-23.png

    It looks really flat and I like the look of it. Will it work with mine? (As in does it allow expansion)

    I was thinking instead of having silver and brown in the inlay I can just have it all a dark-brown so it sort of merges the laminate against the tile. Do you think it would work?
     
  6. Carpet tucker

    Carpet tucker Member

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    That is for LVT, you won't find anything that neat for transitioning from laminate to ceramic
     
  7. Paul webb

    Paul webb Well-Known Member

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    They are just thin strips set into lvt, have a look at the "big T", you may have to glue it to the tiles, with it being a retro fit, but you should be able to make it work
     
  8. Rusty steel

    Rusty steel Member

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    Hard to say without seeing it but there are other options. Take up the metal strips and see how big the gap is. These are just ideas so don't have a go at me people. You could fill the gap with silicon, then use a self leveling screed to bring up to the hight of the wood. Then use something like karndean wood plank and stick over the top? Even a good wood vinyl may work? The gap around the edge I would use a small strip of wood trim stuck round and stained to blend in, better then anything metal.
    But a good floor layer with a few years under his or her belt would come up with something. The amount of problems we have to get over.
    Good luck.
     

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